Simple Health Checks You Can Do At Home In 7 Days

Life's Busy. Doctor's Are expensive. I get it.

It’s hard to find the time (and money) to get regular check-ups for our health. All you “midlifers” out there struggle to keep track of your health because of jam-packed schedules, unrealistic work schedules and family responsibilities. The cost of not monitoring your health now, can ironically come at a much larger cost later on if underlying issues go undetected for too long. 

Early detection and proactive approaches are crucial.

Keeping tabs on the basic markers of health can help identify risk factors such as; high blood pressure, excessive abdominal fat or declining physical fitness before they develop into more serious issues. When we take the proactive approach, we can make the necessary lifestyle changes to improve our health and reduce the risk of chronic disease development (ie. keep our quality of life).

Annual check-ups with your GP are great! But if you’re not actually sick or in pain, you probably don’t actually attend these appointments right? 

I mean we’d all rather save the money if we’re fine. 

This defeats the whole purpose of staying proactive! The point of proactivity is to catch things BEFORE you’re even getting symptoms. 

We need a simple way to consistently monitor ourselves at home. 

Simple DIY Tests you can do at-home...

You know we’re all about TAKING ACTION at The Project. So I’ve outlined the next 7 days for you. 

Here’s your week-long plan of self-administered health screens that will allow you to track your health more efficiently and make some informed decisions about your lifestyle moving forwards. 

Day 1: Measure waist circumference

Why It’s Important: 

Waist circumference is a simple yet effective measure of abdominal fat, a key risk factor for metabolic diseases.

How to Do It:

  1. Use a flexible measuring tape.
  2. Stand up straight and wrap the tape measure around your bare abdomen just above your hip bones.
  3. Ensure the tape is snug but not compressing the skin and is parallel to the floor.
  4. Take the measurement after exhaling normally.

What to Aim For: 

A waist circumference of less than 94cm (37 inches) for men and less than 80cm (31.5 inches) for women is generally considered healthy.

Day 2: Take Blood Pressure

Why It’s Important: 

High blood pressure can lead to serious health problems, including heart disease and stroke.

How to Do It:

  1. Purchase a reliable home blood pressure monitor (you can also get this done at a chemist or pharmacy)
  2. Sit quietly for 5 minutes before measuring.
  3. Place the cuff on your upper arm, following the monitor’s instructions.
  4. Take two or three readings one minute apart and average them.

What to Aim For: 

A normal blood pressure reading is typically around 120/80 mmHg. Consistently higher readings may require lifestyle changes or medical attention.

Day 3: Calculate BMI

Why It’s Important: 

Body Mass Index (BMI) is a quick way to assess whether you are underweight, normal weight, overweight, or obese. Yes, BMI has limitations as it doesn’t tell us anything about what your weight is made up of ie. very athletic or high muscle athletes often get classified as “obese”. However, we can combine this score with other DIY tests to create logical connections between results. 

How to Do It:

  1. Weigh yourself using a reliable scale.
  2. Measure your height.
  3. Use the formula: BMI = weight (kg) / height (m)^2 or use an online BMI calculator such as: https://www.heartfoundation.org.au/bmi-calculator 

What to Aim For: 

A BMI between 18.5 and 24.9 is considered healthy. Below 18.5 is underweight, 25-29.9 is overweight, and 30 and above is obese.

Day 4: 60 second pushup test

Why It’s Important: 

This test measures your upper body strength and endurance.

How to Do It:

  1. Find a flat surface and get into a pushup position.
  2. Start a timer for 60 seconds.
  3. Perform as many pushups as you can, maintaining proper form (keep your back straight, lower your body until your elbows are at 90 degrees, then push back up). Note; it is not a test to see if you can do pushups for one minute straight. We’re testing to see how many reps you can complete in one minute. So you are allowed to take a rest – but make it a short one 60sec goes quick!

What to Aim For: 

The number of pushups varies by age and gender. For men aged 30-39, 17-29 pushups are average; for women, 12-24. For ages 40-49, men should aim for 13-24, and women 8-19.

Day 5: Plank Hold Test

Why It’s Important: 

Planking assesses your core strength and endurance.

How to Do It:

  1. Get into a plank position with your forearms on the ground and body straight.
  2. Start a timer and hold the position as long as you can.
  3. Keep your core tight and avoid letting your hips drop or rise.

What to Aim For: 

A good target for men and women in their 30s is 1-2 minutes. For those in their 40s, 45 seconds to 1.5 minutes is a solid goal.

Day 6: wall sit test

Why It’s Important: 

This test evaluates your lower body strength and endurance.

How to Do It:

  1. Find a clear wall space (PS. make sure it’s a SOLID wall 😂 don’t ask).
  2. Lean against the wall and slide down until your knees are at a 90-degree angle.
  3. Start a timer and hold the position as long as possible.

What to Aim For: 

For men aged 30-39, a time of 1-2 minutes is average; for women, 1-1.5 minutes. For ages 40-49, men should aim for 45 seconds to 1.5 minutes, and women 45 seconds to 1 minute.

day 7: reflect & plan

Why It’s Important: 

Reflecting on your results and planning next steps helps you set realistic goals and make necessary adjustments to your lifestyle.

How to Do It:

  1. Review your results from the past six days.
  2. Identify areas where you excelled and areas that need improvement.
  3. Set specific, achievable goals based on your findings (e.g., incorporate more cardio for better endurance, strength training for muscle mass, or dietary changes for weight management).

What to Aim For: 

Consistent monitoring and gradual improvements. Small changes can lead to significant health benefits over time.

actionable tips to get started immediately

  1. Get the Right Tools: Invest in a reliable measuring tape, blood pressure monitor, and a scale.
  2. Set a Routine: Dedicate a specific time each day for these tests to build consistency.
  3. Track Your Progress: Use a journal or app to record your measurements and test results.
  4. Seek Professional Advice: If any of your results are concerning, consult a healthcare professional for further evaluation and guidance.
  5. Stay Motivated: Share your progress with a friend or join a community group for support and accountability.

By incorporating these self-administered health tests into your routine, you can stay proactive about your health and make informed decisions to improve your well-being. Remember, consistency is key, and small steps can lead to significant changes over time.

Join The Project Today.

Every weekend, you’ll get one new tool, skill or method to upgrade your habits & transform your life in less than 7 minutes.